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wag
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Fri Nov 08, 2013 9:32 pm

laconas wrote:
Sounds like a new BS twist to the BS Snowden story.
Possibly, but then where would this lead?  How does this help Snowden continue the hero line?

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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Fri Nov 08, 2013 9:39 pm

wag wrote:
laconas wrote:
Sounds like a new BS twist to the BS Snowden story.
Possibly, but then where would this lead?  How does this help Snowden continue the hero line?
The hero line is secondary to the goal of structural changes inside the NSA. This story is designed to give him some credibility as a leaker and go against all the talk on netland about the incident just being another govt. op.


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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:28 pm



That's me, Jacob Gold, in 1946 French Resistance





laconas wrote:
Sounds like a new BS twist to the BS Snowden story.

What about Danny Pearl - or Eric Berg - or countless Jewish heroes. What about the French Resistance in WW2.
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Fri Nov 08, 2013 11:22 pm

laconas wrote:
wag wrote:
Possibly, but then where would this lead?  How does this help Snowden continue the hero line?
The hero line is secondary to the goal of structural changes inside the NSA. This story is designed to him some credibility as a leaker rather all the all talk on netland about the incident just being another govt. op.
They already have the new law and NSA leadership change.  Maybe this leads to contracting out NSA IT security to Israel?

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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Sat Nov 09, 2013 1:04 am

Snowie now appears to be something of a liar--previously he implied (if not stated outright) that all his info came thru normal 'legit' job duties. Begs belief that NSA employees casually handed over passwords because they assumed it was OK. C'mon, these folks' careers depend on following security protocol. Even folks working on lower levels don't take chances with messing around w/security.

So likely that Snowden's pals were Sayanim. I can't say for certain that the whole deal isn't a Jewish scheme to increase control over NSA. OTOH much of intel work already contracted out including to Jewish and/or Israeli-connected firms. Plus Snowie being a Booz-Allen contractor has already put the contractors in defensive mode.

Forgive my ignorance but what is the "new law"?
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Sat Nov 09, 2013 2:30 am

EyeBelieve wrote:
Snowie now appears to be something of a liar--previously he implied (if not stated outright) that all his info came thru normal 'legit' job duties.  Begs belief that NSA employees casually handed over passwords because they assumed it was OK.  C'mon, these folks' careers depend on following security protocol.  Even folks working on lower levels don't take chances with messing around w/security.
That fact is probably the biggest 'inside joke' within the ranks of the NSA and other intelligence agencies.

Quote :
So likely that Snowden's pals were Sayanim.
Snowden himself is like a cross between a Sayanim and a Talpiot (non-Israelis are also recruited)

http://www.signallake.com/innovation/Talpiot070607.pdf

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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Sat Nov 09, 2013 11:36 am

EyeBelieve wrote:

Forgive my ignorance but what is the "new law"?  
Involves agencies more regularly reporting to congress (committee hearings) on intel gathering activities.

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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Sun Nov 10, 2013 12:45 am

FrontierJustice wrote:
EyeBelieve wrote:
Snowie now appears to be something of a liar--previously he implied (if not stated outright) that all his info came thru normal 'legit' job duties.  Begs belief that NSA employees casually handed over passwords because they assumed it was OK.  C'mon, these folks' careers depend on following security protocol.  Even folks working on lower levels don't take chances with messing around w/security.
That fact is probably the biggest 'inside joke' within the ranks of the NSA and other intelligence agencies.

Quote :
So likely that Snowden's pals were Sayanim.
Snowden himself is like a cross between a Sayanim and a Talpiot (non-Israelis are also recruited)

http://www.signallake.com/innovation/Talpiot070607.pdf

I think intel security leaks mainly from top-down. AntiWar.com wrote about how Izzies & their civilian Jew neocon chums ushered, w/o clearance, into Pentagon inner sanctums. Guards objected but over-ruled by colonels or whoever.

Folks say Snowie made into a hero--only true for skeptic/libertarian/liberal types, Middle Americans think he's a gold-digging snitch. Weekend Anon protest in DC apparently a resounding failure. Snowden drama just limited-hangout drama to inculcate passive public acceptance of Big Brother. This was necessary since now that all communication is electronic then even avg dummies realize Uncle Sam can & will record it. Snowden's "revelations" seem to minimize NSA capability/operations & are basically elaborations of prev stuff.

If Snowden was strictly a Jew plot to take over NSA (IMO they have it already) thru JMSM hero story then they'd have a better hook, something with personal victims or whatnot. But Snowie is literally (by accident?) a colorless techie, a dry & boring speaker.
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Mon Dec 16, 2013 8:21 pm

wag wrote:
EyeBelieve wrote:
I don't know about the NSA power struggle idea.  CIA has endured the occasional public scandal too & they've long been dominated by Wall St-types.  NSA started by Truman who was a London-Jew tool & possible crypto.  NSA has long illegally spied on Americans & JMSM continues to minimize the actual extent ie saying it collects "metadata" instead of the complete phone calls, email etc that NSA harvests.  

& if NSA is some reservoir of Gentile patriots, where are the fruits?  All we get is one crooked ZOG administration/Congress after another.  Look at NSA contractor firms:  Booz, SAIC, Narus (Israeli-founded) etc, Jew operations though they tend to have enough Gentile officers to hide that.  

Meet the contractors analyzing your private data

From Narus, the Israeli-born Boeing subsidiary that makes NSA’s high-speed interception software...

One of NSA’s most important contractors may be Narus, a subsidiary of Boeing that makes a key telecommunications software that allows government agencies and corporations to monitor huge amounts of data flowing over fiber-optic cables. According to Bill Binney, one of four NSA whistle-blowers who’ve been warning about NSA’s immense powers, one Narus device can analyze 1,250,000 1,000-character emails every second. That comes to over 100 billion emails a day.

“Narus is the one thing that makes it all possible,” Binney told me over the weekend, of the Verizon surveillance program unveiled by the Guardian. “They probably pick up 60 to 80 percent of the data going over the [U.S.] network.” The Narus technology, he added, “reconstructs everything on the line and then passes it off to NSA for storage” and later analysis. That includes everything, he said, including email, cellphone calls, and voice over Internet protocol calls such as those made on Skype.
Maybe you and the media is right, and Snowden is a hero...  Twisted Evil

...And Judges.   pig

Edward Snowden says judge's ruling vindicates NSA surveillance disclosures


• NSA whistleblower welcomes Judge Richard Leon's ruling
• 'Programs would not withstand constitutional challenge'
• Judge: phone surveillance program likely unconstitutional

  • Jump to comments (48)

Edward Snowden in Moscow. 'The the American public deserves a chance to see these issues determined by open court.' Photograph: Sunshinepress/Getty Images
Edward Snowden, the former security contractor who leaked a trove of National Security Agency documents, welcomed a court ruling on Monday that declared the bulk collection of Americans’ telephone records to be a likely violation of the US constitution.


Snowden said the ruling, by a US district judge, justified his disclosures. “I acted on my belief that the NSA's mass surveillance programs would not withstand a constitutional challenge, and that the American public deserved a chance to see these issues determined by open courts," he said in comments released through Glenn Greenwald, the former Guardian journalist who received the documents from Snowden.

"Today, a secret program authorised by a secret court was, when exposed to the light of day, found to violate Americans’ rights. It is the first of many,” said Snowden, whose statement was first reported by the New York Times.

Judge Richard Leon declared that the mass collection of so-called metadata probably violates the fourth amendment, relating to unreasonable searches and seizures, and was "almost Orwellian" in its scope.

He also expressed doubt about the central rationale for the program cited by the NSA: that it is necessary for preventing terrorist attacks. “The government does not cite a single case in which analysis of the NSA’s bulk metadata collection actually stopped an imminent terrorist attack,” wrote Leon, a US district judge in the District of Columbia.

“Given the limited record before me at this point in the litigation – most notably, the utter lack of evidence that a terrorist attack has ever been prevented because searching the NSA database was faster than other investigative tactics – I have serious doubts about the efficacy of the metadata collection program as a means of conducting time-sensitive investigations in cases involving imminent threats of terrorism.”

Leon granted a preliminary injunction sought by plaintiffs Larry Klayman and Charles Strange, concluding that their constitutional challenge was likely to be successful. In what was the only comfort to the NSA in a stinging judgment, he put the ruling on hold, pending an appeal by the government.

Senator Mark Udall, a leading critic of the dragnet collection, welcomed the judgment. "The ruling underscores what I have argued for years: [that] the bulk collection of Americans' phone records conflicts with Americans' privacy rights under the US constitution and has failed to make us safer," said Udall, a Democrat.

Senator Ron Wyden, another NSA critic, also welcomed the ruling. "Judge Leon’s ruling hits the nail on the head. It makes clear that bulk phone records collection is intrusive digital surveillance and not simply inoffensive data collection as some have said."

He went on: “Significantly, the judge also noted that he had ‘serious doubts about the efficacy of the program.’ The reason that he and many others have these doubts is that the executive branch’s claims about this program’s effectiveness are now crumbling under public scrutiny. Protecting the country from terrorism is obviously vitally important but the government can do this without collecting the phone records of massive numbers of law-abiding men, women and children.”

At the White House, spokesman Jay Carney said he had no comment on the on the case, saying he had not heard of the decision when the press briefing started and referred reporters to the Justice Department for reaction.

“We’ve seen the opinion and are studying it. We believe the program is constitutional as previous judges have found. We have no further comment at this time," said Justice Department spokesman Andrew Ames.

You have to admit it is a bit odd that NSA actions are declared illegal, but Google was (and still is) doing the same thing for years...

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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Mon Dec 16, 2013 8:33 pm

While the media writes stories about Snowden as a whistleblower, the takeover of the NSA with new machines and methods is complete. How does that Hegel thing go again?
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Mon Dec 16, 2013 10:26 pm

Judge Leon is just doing Jewish theater, making them the heroes. His decision will be overturned or ignored.
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Mon Dec 16, 2013 10:48 pm

laconas wrote:
While the media writes stories about Snowden as a whistleblower, the takeover of the NSA with new machines and methods is complete. How does that Hegel thing go again?

I wonder if Snowdenberg's 'revelations' are meant to discourage people from being more active on the net, not unlike the way Alex Jonestein's bs is to coil people up into balls of isolation. Seems to me to be failing, even though totalitarian surveillance continues to tighten - maybe in spite of it.

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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Tue Dec 17, 2013 6:37 pm

wag wrote:
You have to admit it is a bit odd that NSA actions are declared illegal, but Google was (and still is) doing the same thing for years...
Ah... But Google is so trustworthy and nice... What could they do?

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"As a leader, my first and foremost priority is the welfare of all the nation's citizens." Evil? Then, fuck you everybody. wag...
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Tue Dec 17, 2013 6:55 pm

FrontierJustice wrote:
laconas wrote:
While the media writes stories about Snowden as a whistleblower, the takeover of the NSA with new machines and methods is complete. How does that Hegel thing go again?

I wonder if Snowdenberg's 'revelations' are meant to discourage people from being more active on the net, not unlike the way Alex Jonestein's bs is to coil people up into balls of isolation. Seems to me to be failing, even though totalitarian surveillance continues to tighten - maybe in spite of it.


I think that's part of it.
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Tue Dec 17, 2013 10:49 pm

Another Snowden angle: look, all this Big Brother info was going to come out sooner or later. NSA benefits thru "leaked" info--in inevitable Supreme Court tests they can argue that since people email/text/phone all the time knowing it's being recorded, folks have no expectation of privacy!

Actually re email I think there's already a major court precedent claiming No Expectation of Privacy.
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Wed Dec 18, 2013 12:08 am

EyeBelieve wrote:
Another Snowden angle:  look, all this Big Brother info was going to come out sooner or later.  NSA benefits thru "leaked" info--in inevitable Supreme Court tests they can argue that since people email/text/phone all the time knowing it's being recorded, folks have no expectation of privacy!

Actually re email I think there's already a major court precedent claiming No Expectation of Privacy.

We know that any court ruling would either directly, indirectly, or subsequently benefit jews. How could they use this against states like Texas, for both protection against state surveillance and avenues for federal (i.e., jew-controlled) surveillance?

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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Wed Dec 18, 2013 3:55 pm

Meanwhile jews continue working this to laughable results...



DOD official: Snowden ‘stole everything — literally everything’
1:21 PM 12/17/2013

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden stole vastly more information than previously speculated, and is holding it at ransom for his own protection.

“What’s floating is so dangerous, we’d be behind for twenty years in terms of access (if it were to be leaked),” a ranking Department of Defense official told the Daily Caller.

“He stole everything — literally everything,” the official said.


Last month British and U.S. intelligence officials speculated Snowden had in his possession a “doomsday cache” of intelligence information, including the names of undercover intelligence personnel stationed around the world.


“Sources briefed on the matter” told Reuters that such a cache could be used as an insurance policy in the event Snowden was captured, and that, “the worst was yet to come.”

The officials cited no hard evidence of such a cache, but indicated it was a possible worst-case-scenario. Some version of that scenario appears to have come true.

“It’s only accessible for a few hours a day, and is triple encrypted to the point where no one can break it,” the official said of the data cloud where Snowden has likely hidden the information.

According to the official, there are at least two others in possession of the code to access the information, and, “if we nail him — he’ll release the data.”

“Everything you don’t want the enemy to know, he has,” the official said. “Who we’re listening to, what we’re after — they’d shut us down.”

The damage would be “of biblical proportions,” the official said.   Suspect 

Another official from the NSA task force commissioned to assess the data stolen and leaked by Snowden said on television recently that granting Snowden amnesty is “worth having a conversation about” in order to secure any potential stolen data.

Director of the NSA Gen. Keith Alexander said on “60 Minutes” Sunday that he opposes the idea, and said that people need to be held accountable for their actions. The White House stated Monday it would not be changing its policy regarding Snowden.

The NSA director has repeatedly testified before Congress about the revealed programs, and continues to state that the leaks have compromised U.S. national security.

Alexander announced in October he would be retiring as NSA director and head of U.S. Cyber Command effective March, and a recent White House task force charged with improving NSA transparency has suggested appointing a civilian head  clown to steer the signals intelligence agency.

The official said that following Alexander’s retirement, he doesn’t “know how (the amnesty conversation) is going to play out.”

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2013/12/17/dod-official-snowden-stole-everything-literally-everything/#ixzz2nr0UWMKI

Hmmm, should this "leak" to dailycaller.com be investigated as damaging to national interests?  Knowing this, all an enemy would need to do is capture and torture/waterboard Snowden (e.g., Gitmo style) for all the info?

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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Thu Dec 19, 2013 2:35 am

wag wrote:
We know that any court ruling would either directly, indirectly, or subsequently benefit jews.  How could they use this against states like Texas, for both protection against state surveillance and avenues for federal (i.e., jew-controlled) surveillance?

Well my position is that court decisions, possible "limiting" of surveillance etc is bs for public consumption.  NSA works by hoovering up everything.  Trying to filter what goes into the hard drives would be difficult & problematic.  NSA-type spying has been around for a long time but has hardly been used to go after Jews.  Jeez even the publicly-known Wall St emails show criminal conspiracies but no major criminal prosecutions.  Gov't has gone after patriots, Texas or elsewhere, for a long time too, undoubtedly intel was used.

RE Snowden "revelation" about all phone #'s in all calls being recorded, I'm thinking that was easily within NSA capabilities from mid-60's on.  In WWI Western Union sent the Feds a daily truckload of copies of all telegrams.  If Jews wanted some major change they'd tell the truth about real extent/history of NSA & related spying.

BTW South Park I'm seeing is new episode about Eric Cartman (white Nazi) wanting to find out NSA files on him.   So far the message seems to be NSA Good, Skeptics Bad.
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Thu Jan 02, 2014 1:14 pm

Editorial
Edward Snowden, Whistle-Blower
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD


Seven months ago, the world began to learn the vast scope of the National Security Agency’s reach into the lives of hundreds of millions of people in the United States and around the globe, as it collects information about their phone calls, their email messages, their friends and contacts, how they spend their days and where they spend their nights. The public learned in great detail how the agency has exceeded its mandate and abused its authority, prompting outrage at kitchen tables and at the desks of Congress, which may finally begin to limit these practices.


For Op-Ed, follow @nytopinion and to hear from the editorial page editor, Andrew Rosenthal, follow @andyrNYT.

The revelations have already prompted two federal judges to accuse the N.S.A. of violating the Constitution (although a third, unfortunately, found the dragnet surveillance to be legal). A panel appointed by President Obama issued a powerful indictment of the agency’s invasions of privacy and called for a major overhaul of its operations.

All of this is entirely because of information provided to journalists by Edward Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor who stole a trove of highly classified documents after he became disillusioned with the agency’s voraciousness. Mr. Snowden is now living in Russia, on the run from American charges of espionage and theft, and he faces the prospect of spending the rest of his life looking over his shoulder.

Considering the enormous value of the information he has revealed, and the abuses he has exposed, Mr. Snowden deserves better than a life of permanent exile, fear and flight. He may have committed a crime to do so, but he has done his country a great service. It is time for the United States to offer Mr. Snowden a plea bargain or some form of clemency that would allow him to return home, face at least substantially reduced punishment in light of his role as a whistle-blower, and have the hope of a life advocating for greater privacy and far stronger oversight of the runaway intelligence community.

Discuss
Do you think that the Obama Administration should offer Edward Snowden some form of clemency?
Please tell us in the comments below.

Mr. Snowden is currently charged in a criminal complaint with two violations of the Espionage Act involving unauthorized communication of classified information, and a charge of theft of government property. Those three charges carry prison sentences of 10 years each, and when the case is presented to a grand jury for indictment, the government is virtually certain to add more charges, probably adding up to a life sentence that Mr. Snowden is understandably trying to avoid.

The president said in August that Mr. Snowden should come home to face those charges in court and suggested that if Mr. Snowden had wanted to avoid criminal charges he could have simply told his superiors about the abuses, acting, in other words, as a whistle-blower.

“If the concern was that somehow this was the only way to get this information out to the public, I signed an executive order well before Mr. Snowden leaked this information that provided whistle-blower protection to the intelligence community for the first time,” Mr. Obama said at a news conference. “So there were other avenues available for somebody whose conscience was stirred and thought that they needed to question government actions.”

In fact, that executive order did not apply to contractors, only to intelligence employees, rendering its protections useless to Mr. Snowden. More important, Mr. Snowden told The Washington Post earlier this month that he did report his misgivings to two superiors at the agency, showing them the volume of data collected by the N.S.A., and that they took no action. (The N.S.A. says there is no evidence of this.) That’s almost certainly because the agency and its leaders don’t consider these collection programs to be an abuse and would never have acted on Mr. Snowden’s concerns.
In retrospect, Mr. Snowden was clearly justified in believing that the only way to blow the whistle on this kind of intelligence-gathering was to expose it to the public and let the resulting furor do the work his superiors would not. Beyond the mass collection of phone and Internet data, consider just a few of the violations he revealed or the legal actions he provoked:

■ The N.S.A. broke federal privacy laws, or exceeded its authority, thousands of times per year, according to the agency’s own internal auditor.

■ The agency broke into the communications links of major data centers around the world, allowing it to spy on hundreds of millions of user accounts and infuriating the Internet companies that own the centers. Many of those companies are now scrambling to install systems that the N.S.A. cannot yet penetrate.

■ The N.S.A. systematically undermined the basic encryption systems of the Internet, making it impossible to know if sensitive banking or medical data is truly private, damaging businesses that depended on this trust.

■ His leaks revealed that James Clapper Jr., the director of national intelligence, lied to Congress when testifying in March that the N.S.A. was not collecting data on millions of Americans. (There has been no discussion of punishment for that lie.)

■ The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court rebuked the N.S.A. for repeatedly providing misleading information about its surveillance practices, according to a ruling made public because of the Snowden documents. One of the practices violated the Constitution, according to the chief judge of the court.

■ A federal district judge ruled earlier this month that the phone-records-collection program probably violates the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution. He called the program “almost Orwellian” and said there was no evidence that it stopped any imminent act of terror.

The shrill brigade of his critics say Mr. Snowden has done profound damage to intelligence operations of the United States, but none has presented the slightest proof that his disclosures really hurt the nation’s security. Many of the mass-collection programs Mr. Snowden exposed would work just as well if they were reduced in scope and brought under strict outside oversight, as the presidential panel recommended.

When someone reveals that government officials have routinely and deliberately broken the law, that person should not face life in prison at the hands of the same government. That’s why Rick Ledgett, who leads the N.S.A.’s task force on the Snowden leaks, recently told CBS News that he would consider amnesty if Mr. Snowden would stop any additional leaks. And it’s why President Obama should tell his aides to begin finding a way to end Mr. Snowden’s vilification and give him an incentive to return home.

Meet The New York Times’s Editorial Board »

Jews won't leave one of theirs out hanging?  Or maybe the NSA should start taking a good hard look at the NYT board...

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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Thu Jan 02, 2014 2:13 pm

wag wrote:
Hmmm, should this "leak" to dailycaller.com be investigated as damaging to national interests? Knowing this, all an enemy would need to do is capture and torture/waterboard Snowden (e.g., Gitmo style) for all the info?
Wag you seriously think water boarding or torture works? Actually the people in charge if actually know something they need to hear will put you in a room with some guy whole go from guilt tripping you. Despite the whole "other countries are torture happy" image most of those countries use it disciplinary not as interrogation-ly...

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"As a leader, my first and foremost priority is the welfare of all the nation's citizens." Evil? Then, fuck you everybody. wag...
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Thu Jan 02, 2014 4:39 pm

The Snowden Obama Amnesty Double Standard

01/02/14 12:45 PM—Updated 01/02/14 01:36 PM


By Adam Serwer
Many people otherwise inclined to concur with the New York Times op-ed page and support President Barack Obama may disagree with the paper’s call for leniency for Edward Snowden. 
“Considering the enormous value of the information he has revealed, and the abuses he has exposed, Mr. Snowden deserves better than a life of permanent exile, fear and flight. He may have committed a crime to do so, but he has done his country a great service,” the paper editorializes. “It is time for the United States to offer Mr. Snowden a plea bargain or some form of clemency that would allow him to return home, face at least substantially reduced punishment in light of his role as a whistle-blower, and have the hope of a life advocating for greater privacy and far stronger oversight of the runaway intelligence community.”


Opponents of leniency for Snowden would likely argue that, even if his exposure of the breadth of the National Security Agency’s metadata program was in the public interest, other disclosures–such as revelations regarding Russian and Chinese targets of American surveillance–were not. They might also argue that Snowden clearly committed a crime in absconding with and leaking classified documents and should be punished for it. Some former intelligence and national security officials are convinced Snowden has been compromised by foreign intelligence agencies–something Snowden himself has strenuously denied.

Yet the argument that Snowden’s allegedly straightforward violation of the law should mandate punishment is undermined by the Obama administration’s very conduct in office. Since the beginning, the Obama administration has adhered to a double-standard when it comes to violations of the law by national security officials, punishing those that arouse the ire of the national security establishment while looking the other way when the law is broken in pursuit of their goals.



Before even taking office, Obama indicated publicly that he was unwilling to look into prosecution of Bush-era officials for their role in crafting torturous interrogation policies, saying he would look into whether “someone had blatantly broken the law” but that he possessed ”a belief that we need to look forward as opposed to looking backwards.” A probe initiated by Attorney General Eric Holder ultimately examined only lower level intelligence officials, and only in those cases where torture had gone beyond the limits proscribed by the Justice Department. Not only did the probe end without any prosecutions, but CIA officials involved in the so-called “enhanced interrogation program” have seen their careers advance within the Agency. Beyond prosecution, the Obama administration has fought lawsuits in civil court by former detainees seeking restitution for their mistreatment.

Obama supporters could argue that anything more than that might have sidelined Obama’s first term agenda permanently, to the point where there wouldn’t be an Affordable Care Act. Still, we needn’t look back that far for more examples of the Obama administration “looking forward” on possible violations of the law when they’re done in the interest of the intelligence community. Obama officials leak to journalists all the time when they’re trying to shape coverage, but they’re only prosecuted if, like former NSA executive Thomas Drake, their disclosures anger the intelligence community.

Obama’s intelligence chief, James Clapper, admitted to misleading Congress when asked a direct question by Oregon Democratic Senator Ron Wyden about whether the NSA “any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans.” It’s against the law to lie to Congress, but when White House Press Secretary Jay Carney was asked about Clapper’s statement, Carney said in June that Obama “certainly believes that Director Clapper has been straight and direct in the answers that he’s given.” The smart money is on Clapper never having to seek asylum in Russia to avoid prosecution.



Leniency for Snowden may not be as far-fetched as it sounds. Already NSA official Richard Ledgett floated the idea of amnesty for Snowden in exchange for securing the rest of his data in an interview with CBS, although his overture was promptly shot down by the administration.


Anne-Marie Slaughter, a former high ranking official in the State Department during the Obama administration, tweeted that she agreed with the New York Times editorial.



Even if they don’t support what Snowden has done, some government officials might be inclined to strike a deal if they believe that it could somehow mitigate the damage they believe Snowden has caused.

If the Justice Department did strike some kind of deal with Snowden, it certainly wouldn’t be the first time that the Obama administration has allowed a former member of the intelligence community to escape punishment for allegedly violating the law. It would just be one of the few times the Obama administration was willing to “look forward” when the intelligence community wasn’t.

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wag
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Thu Jan 02, 2014 4:43 pm

Germanic Fox wrote:
wag wrote:
Hmmm, should this "leak" to dailycaller.com be investigated as damaging to national interests?  Knowing this, all an enemy would need to do is capture and torture/waterboard Snowden (e.g., Gitmo style) for all the info?
Wag you seriously think water boarding or torture works? Actually the people in charge if actually know something they need to hear will put you in a room with some guy whole go from guilt tripping you. Despite the whole "other countries are torture happy" image most of those countries use it disciplinary not as interrogation-ly...  

I suspect there are various ways for making one talk.  Then again, I've seen movies.

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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Thu Jan 02, 2014 5:24 pm

The Jews bringing Snowden back was expected. No surprise here.
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Thu Jan 02, 2014 9:46 pm

I would think no move toward amnesty until after the election, at minimum.
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PostSubject: Re: Snowden and the Jews   Thu Jan 02, 2014 10:54 pm

EyeBelieve wrote:
I would think no move toward amnesty until after the election, at minimum.

You never know. If the Ruskies are planning to counter the Jews at Sochi with--they listen in on your phone calls and want to rape your children, the Jews might have to move fast to fast get Snowden out.
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