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 Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?

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PostSubject: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Tue Apr 19, 2016 2:50 pm

Plenty Of Friction Expected During Obama's Visit To Saudi Arabia


i
President Obama shakes hands with Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud following a meeting in November at the G20 summit in Antalya, Turkey.

Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images


President Obama leaves this afternoon for Saudi Arabia, and what could be an uncomfortable visit.
King Salman and neighboring leaders are unhappy with the president's overtures to their regional enemy, Iran. And Obama only added to that tension with a magazine interview that was anything but diplomatic.

"It's going to be a tough visit," says Ilan Goldenberg of the Center for a New American Security.

In a lengthy interview with the Atlantic Magazine's Jeffrey Goldberg, Obama said the Saudis need to find a way to "share the neighborhood" with the Iranians. That was salt in the wound for the Saudis, already rattled by the U.S. nuclear deal with Iran and Obama's backtracking from his red line in Syria.

Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes says differences are inevitable in a relationship as complex as the one between the United States and Saudi Arabia. Analysts say the two countries have similar goals but very different priorities.

"We have a common enemy in the Islamic State," says David Ottaway of the Woodrow Wilson Center. "For the Saudis, it just so happens that even more important to them is overthrowing [Syrian President Bashar al] Assad, and if possible containing and rolling back Iranian influence in the Arab world."

Saudi Arabia Turns To Plan B As Low Oil Prices Rattle Economy



The Saudis' rivalry with Iran dates back decades, but it has boiled over in recent years. Goldenberg says both countries are acting more aggressively because they believe the United States is stepping back from the Middle East.

"If you want the Iranians and the Saudis to find a way to coexist, you first need to send a pretty strong signal to both of them," Goldenberg says. "To the Saudis, that the U.S. will be there to have their back; to the Iranians, that there is a limit to what the United States will tolerate — and there will come a time if you act too aggressively, the United States will find a way to push back."

Part of the president's mission on this trip is reassuring the Saudis and their Persian Gulf neighbors. The administration says that, otherwise, hostility between Iran and Saudi Arabia will continue to fuel sectarian violence and instability throughout the region, which only helps groups like the Islamic State.
The White House is encouraged by the tentative cease-fire in neighboring Yemen where, a deadly proxy war has been raging for more than a year.

"The fight in Yemen has distracted from the crucial fight against ISIL and against al-Qaida," says Rob Malley, who coordinates Middle East policy for the White House. "As that fight de-escalates, the countries that have been involved in that fight will be able to focus more of their activities against ISIL and against al-Qaida."

Another potential irritant in the U.S.-Saudi relationship is renewed scrutiny of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Saudi Arabia long has denied any official role in the attacks, but suspicion was piqued by a recent 60 Minutes story that focused on 28 pages from a still-classified congressional report.


Saudis Threaten Economic Repercussions If Congress Passes 9/11 Bill


Attorney Sean Carter, who represents Sept. 11 victims' family members, admits that the timing of the story is awkward for the president's diplomatic efforts, but argues that the administration could have solved that by making the report public long ago.

"The administration has really kicked this can down the road since coming into office in early 2009," Carter says. "And this is sort of what happens when you take that approach."

The Saudis insist they have no objection to declassifying the report. The White House says only that it could be made public by the end of the year.

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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Wed Apr 20, 2016 3:47 am

Article:

'In a lengthy interview with the Atlantic Magazine's Jeffrey Goldberg, Obama said the Saudis need to find a way to "share the neighborhood" with the Iranians. That was salt in the wound for the Saudis, already rattled by the U.S. nuclear deal with Iran and Obama's backtracking from his red line in Syria.'

Press TV (Iran) 4/20/16
Obama visits Saudi Arabia amid tensions
http://www.presstv.ir/Detail/2016/04/20/461640/Obama-visits-Saudi-amid-tensions-/

Obama will arrive in Riyadh on Wednesday to meet with King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud and sit with leaders from [Persian] Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries.

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter is on the trip with Obama.


They want to reassure the Saudis that they don't trust Iran either, and Carter's presence adds weight to that ongoing theme. The main impact here will be that he puts on five pounds at the buffet.  



The anti-Iran slant by the Saudis is just as fabricated as the anti-Assad deal. They're definitely unconcerned about any 9/11 'revelations', which are only a convenient distraction for obvious failures in Washington.  Obama goes easy on them and drinks weak tea and goes home.  Nothing changes, and they'll say it was a productive exchange.
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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Wed Apr 20, 2016 2:23 pm

puckatawk wrote:

The anti-Iran slant by the Saudis is just as fabricated as the anti-Assad deal. They're definitely unconcerned about any 9/11 'revelations', which are only a convenient distraction for obvious failures in Washington.  Obama goes easy on them and drinks weak tea and goes home.  Nothing changes, and they'll say it was a productive exchange.

Odd that Obama is sent on this trip.  As if the jewish Saudis don't realize he's not the deal maker, just the puppet.

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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Thu Apr 21, 2016 9:35 am

White House: Obama 'cleared the air' with Saudi Arabia

By Nicole Gaouette, Kevin Liptak, Michelle Kosinski and Nic Robertson, CNN
Updated 7:31 PM ET, Wed April 20, 2016

Story highlights

  • The U.S and Saudi Arabia aren't at the end of a love affair, so much as in an unhappy marriage
  • The two countries are bound by military links and a shared fight against terrorism



(CNN)The White House moved to tamp down suggestions that ties with Saudi Arabia are fraying, with administration officials saying that President Barack Obama "really cleared the air" with King Salman at a meeting Wednesday.
Yet even as White House officials stressed that the leaders made progress, a prominent member of the Saudi royal family told CNN "a recalibration" of the U.S.-Saudi relationship was needed amid regional upheaval, dropping oil prices and ongoing strains between the two longtime allies.
Obama landed in Riyadh earlier Wednesday for a summit with Gulf leaders and spent two-and-a-half hours meeting with the 80-year-old monarch on issues that have recently strained the alliance, including the conflict in Yemen, the role of Iran, Lebanon's instability and the fight against ISIS, U.S. officials said.
Statements after the meeting made clear that deep differences remain on several of these points, with the two sides agreeing to disagree and a U.S. official characterizing the encounter as the start of a discussion rather than a venue for solutions.
But the two leaders glossed over some of the thorniest matters, including a Saudi threat to dump U.S. assets if Obama signs into law a bill that could make the kingdom liable for damages stemming from the September 11 terror attacks.
There is going to have to be "a recalibration of our relationship with America," former Saudi Intelligence Chief Prince Turki Al-Faisal told CNN's Christiane Amanpour. "How far we can go with our dependence on America, how much can we rely on steadfastness from American leadership, what is it that makes for our joint benefits to come together," Turki said in a significant departure from usual Saudi rhetoric. "These are things that we have to recalibrate."

An unhappy marriage

For all the crosscurrents buffetting U.S.-Saudi relations, analysts and former officials say the two countries aren't at the end of a love affair so much as in an unhappy marriage in which both sides, for better or worse, are stuck with each other.
"Despite all these differences, Saudi Arabia and America are not getting divorced," said Bruce Riedel, director of the Intelligence Project at the Brookings Institution and a former CIA official. "We need each other."
It's tough going, though. The Saudis have little confidence in Obama's commitment to their security and fear he's shifting U.S. attentions to its rival, Iran; Obama has described the Saudis as "so-called allies" and has complained their policies fuel anti-U.S. terror and regional chaos.
In the U.S. Congress, a growing drumbeat of criticism about Saudi Arabia is finding expression in efforts to restrict arms sales to Riyadh, expose alleged Saudi involvement in the September 11 terror attacks and allow it to be sued for that day's destruction and death.
The clamor coincides with increasing domestic energy resources that lessen the U.S. need for foreign oil. Moreover, the allies are divided by a slew of issues including the approach to the wars in Syria and Yemen, the Iranian nuclear deal and the influence Tehran wields in Iraq.
These regional issues are topping Obama's agenda during his visit this week as he looks for backing for the fight against ISIS in Syria and Iraq. And they are dynamics that are set to persist and color the U.S.-Saudi relationship for the next occupant of the Oval Office as well. Turki told CNN that the changes underway will last long after Obama leaves office.
"I don't think that we should expect any new president in America to go back to, as I said, the yesteryear days when things were different," Turki said.

A chilly welcome

The prince made his unprecedented comments as Obama landed in Riyadh to a reception that social media critics termed a snub, but U.S. officials strongly disputed. The Saudi government dispatched the governor of Riyadh and Foreign Minister Adel Al-Jubair to shake Obama's hand, a departure from the scene at the airport earlier in the day when King Salman was shown on state television greeting the leaders of other Gulf nations on the tarmac.
A U.S. official said Salman's absence upon arrival was not taken as a snub and noted that Obama rarely greets foreign leaders when they land in the U.S. for meetings. Obama went immediately to the Erga Palace to meet the King shortly after landing, but the perceived slight on his arrival was seen as one more sign that a relationship long lubricated by barrels of oil is encountering friction.
Fawaz Gerges, an expert on Islamic-Western relations at the London School of Economics, called their current dynamic "an estrangement" but not a break that would end U.S. involvement in the Middle East.
He's among many analysts who say that, as unlikely as the union between a rigidly conservative Islamic monarchy with a questionable human rights record and a secular democratic republic may seem, neither will be able to cut the ties the bind them.
The two countries are connected by military links and sales, a shared fight against terrorism, the need to leverage each other's diplomatic clout and, for the U.S., the necessity of ensuring that world oil supplies flow freely.
READ: Cheap oil isn't Saudi Arabia's only big risk

'Blood oil': How you can stop funding dictators
Though the U.S. imports fewer barrels of Saudi crude and petroleum than it did on the day of Obama's first inauguration, the energy needs of its allies -- particularly in Asia -- are crucial to global and U.S. economic health.
"U.S. energy independence doesn't really change the equation that much because of the global strategic importance of the oil supplies," said Hussein Ibish, a senior resident scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington.
Saudi Arabia also carries diplomatic weight in the region that the U.S. has used to serve its interests.
The "Saudis are such an influential actor in the Middle East and broader Muslim world that no secretary of state or president has truly wanted to go it without them," said David Weinberg, a Saudi Arabia expert at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies.
As the Arab Spring has devolved into chaotic violence, Saudi Arabia has provided funds that have stabilized key U.S. allies, including Egypt, Bahrain and Jordan, and it has developed stronger ties with one of its longtime enemies, Israel, the closest U.S. ally in the region.
READ: Yemen ceasefire goes into effect

War on Terror: Offering Arab cover




Saudis warn of economic payback for 9/11 bill 05:41
On the most kinetic level, the two countries are linked by counterterrorism efforts that will go on for years.
It was reported in 2013 that the U.S. operates an unacknowledged drone base out of Saudi Arabia and is relying on the country to fight al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, the Yemen-based group that the Obama administration has called the most serious threat to the American homeland.
Separately, the U.S. "needs Saudi Arabia to provide Arab cover for the American-led coalition fighting the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria," said David Ottaway, a Wilson Center expert on the kingdom. "The overall U.S. war on terrorism in the Middle East cannot be won without Saudi help."
The militaries of both countries are linked in nuts-and-bolts ways, too. Saudi Arabia "is by far the world's largest purchaser of U.S. weaponry," said Nawaf Obaid, a visiting fellow at Harvard University who estimated that it has is over $100 billion worth of equipment on order from U.S. defense contractors.
READ: McConnell, Ryan decline to back 9/11 lawsuit bill
Not only does that translate into jobs for U.S. workers, but the equipment also comes with support from the Pentagon in the form of training that creates deep ties between the two militaries.
The Saudis, for all their frustration with the U.S., "just don't have alternatives," said Ibish. "They can talk about Europe and China and Russia all they like, but in the end, its military is structured around the United States and only the United States can provide the leadership they're looking for."
READ: Nine Guantanamo detainees transferred to Saudi Arabia

Uncertain times for the House of Saud

The tensions are compounding an already uncertain time for the House of Saud. A transition in 2015 introduced a new and largely untested group of leaders at a time when the falling price of oil has saddled Saudi Arabia with its first budget deficits.
And it has embarked on a protracted war in Yemen that is earning it U.S. condemnation even though the Saudis see themselves as shouldering their region's security challenges just as the White House has asked.
Saudi Arabia, feeling threatened by the overthrow of a friendly government on its border, has intervened against the Iran-backed Houthi rebels while also trying to strike al Qaeda there.
"Obama was encouraging them to take responsibility for their own security and that's what the Saudis are doing," Ottaway said. "But when your allies decide they're going to act on their own, they don't necessarily do what you want them to do."
The administration has quietly criticized the humanitarian cost of the Yemen conflict, for which it is providing intelligence, weapons and ammunition as the region's strongest al Qaeda affiliate exploits the conflict.
"Al Qaeda's most dangerous branch is seeing this Saudi-led war as a godsend," Weinberg said. "That's something the Saudis haven't treated as a priority."
WATCH: Saudi Arabia prepares for post-oil economy

Saudis recoil from U.S. criticism

The criticism is another sore point for Saudi Arabia, which has long had fraught relations with Obama.
Even before he became President, Obama referred to the Saudis as "our so-called allies" at a 2002 rally. After he took office, Riyadh saw his decision to support the 2011 ouster of long-time Egyptian leader and U.S. ally Hosni Mubarak as a betrayal of the established order.
That was compounded when the U.S. announced it had been secretly meeting with Saudi Arabia's regional arch-rival Iran for talks that led to the 2015 nuclear agreement.



Iran: We don't have 'a fight to pick with Saudi Arabia' 02:18
Saudi fears that Obama's so-called pivot to Asia meant he was pulling away from the Middle East deepened in 2012, when the President set a red line for taking military action against the Syrian regime -- a government backed by Iran and opposed by Riyadh -- and then changed his mind once Damascus crossed it.
When Obama told The Atlantic Magazine this year that he was aggravated by "free riders" -- "people who push us to act but then showing an unwillingness to put any skin in the game" -- he earned a rare public rebuttal from the Saudis.
Though Obama hadn't named any country, Turki asked him in an open letter whether it was "because you have pivoted to Iran so much" that he had forgotten "the Kingdom's 80 years of constant friendship."

The 28 pages

After the years of increasing distance, many in Saudi Arabia have adopted a mantra that Weinberg of the FDD said boils down to "wait until the next administration."
But that may be a mistake, he warned, as there is increasingly vocal anti-Saudi sentiment in Congress and the growing gaps between the two nations are dependent on circumstance rather than individual leaders.
A bipartisan group of current and former lawmakers are pushing for the release of 28 classified pages from the 9/11 Commission that reportedly include evidence that Saudi officials in the U.S. at the time lent support to some of the 15 Saudis who were among the 19 terrorists who conducted that attack.
A large bipartisan group of Senate and House lawmakers has backed a bill that would allow families of the 9/11 victims to sue foreign states if they helped fund or support a terrorist attack on U.S. soil. While the White House is lobbying against the bill, the Saudis have reacted by warning they would sell off $750 billion in U.S. assets if it becomes law.
The veto threat led families of 9/11 victims to write Obama on Tuesday to say they "view the disregard and dismissal of our loved ones' deaths implicit in both these threats and their acceptance as disrespectful and improper."

Administration wrong about terrorism sponsor act (Opinion)
OPINION: Obama is wrong about the terrorism act
The bill has drawn the backing of Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders and is co-sponsored by GOP candidate Ted Cruz. And Republican front-runner Donald Trump has said that Saudi Arabia should pay for more of its own defense.
Meanwhile, another group of Republican and Democratic senators banded together last week to propose a bill to limit arms sales to Saudi Arabia to protest the way it's conducting the war in Yemen.
The dynamic points to continued tension after Obama leaves office.
There are areas where the U.S. and Saudi Arabia are in conflict, and political elites across the board "reflect those feelings," according to Weinberg.
"This is not something that can be personalized down to the views of the commander in chief," he said.



Typical long-winded, nothingness from MSM.  Not one mention of Putin, with all his oil clout and recent calling for "transparency" in the oil markets, ...or the jewish pivoting.  But I guess we're supposed to believe that Obama is some great negotiator in light of Trump's rhetoric.  Maybe that is why he went, to set something up in jewish history? 

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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Thu Apr 21, 2016 9:39 am

Quote :

But I guess we're supposed to believe that Obama is some great negotiator in light of Trump's rhetoric.  Maybe that is why he went, to set something up in jewish history?






Report: Obama Seeks Meeting With Iranian President




AP
     
BY:  Adam Kredo
April 20, 2016 4:06 pm
President Barack Obama has sent two letters to senior Iranian leaders in recent months requesting a meeting with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, according to Persian language reports recently translated by a Middle East research organization.
“President Obama asked to meet with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani in two secret letters sent in late March to both Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and President Rouhani,” according to the Middle East Media Research Institute, or MEMRI, which translated a Farsi-language report published Tuesday by a website affiliated with Iran’s Green movement.
Obama purportedly wrote in the correspondence “that Iran has a limited-time opportunity to cooperate with the U.S. in order to resolve the problems in Syria, Iraq, and Yemen, and promised that if Iran agreed to a meeting between him and Rouhani, he would be willing to participate in any conference to this end,” according to MEMRI’s translation of the report.
The reports could not be independently verified. A State Department spokesperson referred the Washington Free Beacon to the White House for comment on the report. The White House declined to comment on record.
Iranian leaders are said to be open to Obama’s request.
The Iranian report “further stressed that Supreme Leader Khamenei discussed the request with President Rouhani, that Rouhani said that Iran should accept the request and meet with Obama, and that such a meeting could lead to an end to the crises in the region while increasing Iran’s influence in their resolution,” MEMRI wrote. “Rouhani promised Khamenei that any move would be coordinated with him and reported to him. According to the report, Khamenei agreed with Rouhani.”
Senior U.S. officials have met with top Iranian officials in recent days in a move perceived by some as laying the groundwork for a future powwow between Obama and Rouhani.
Secretary of State John Kerry met with his Iranian counterpart, Javad Zarif, in New York on Tuesday. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew met last week with Valiollah Seif, the governor of Iran’s Central Bank.
Amir Toumaj, an Iran expert and research analyst at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, expressed doubt that the Iranian Supreme Leader would concede to such a meeting, as it may empower more moderate elements of the Iranian regime.
“It seems highly unlikely that Khamenei would give his assent. There is a significant political cost for him, and he doesn’t have the appetite,” Toumaj told the Free Beacon. “The [nuclear agreement] is still fresh. There may be just a little over a year left until the 2017 Iranian presidential elections, but there is too much at stake.”
“Khamenei and the radicals have markedly escalated their attacks on Rouhani on the merits and benefits of the JCPOA,” or Joint Compressive Plan of Agreement, he added. “A meeting with President Obama would give Rouhani political capital and reopen the debate on rapprochement.”
An Obama-Rouhani face-to-face could reignite debates in Iran about rapprochement with the United States.
“An Iranian president shaking hands with the ‘Great Satan’ would not be a minor event,” Toumaj said. “Just today, Khamenei delivered remarks on how the U.S. wants to keep Iran ‘backwards’ and is waging a ‘soft war’ to spread Western cultural values among the youth and undermine the revolution from the inside. This regime cannot survive in its current shape without anti-Americanism.”
“It seems highly unlikely that Khamenei would give his assent, though some kind of communications channel to discuss the issue would not be entirely outside the realm of possibility, especially if it would serve Tehran’s interest,” Toumaj said. “There is, however, political cost for Khamenei especially for the direct face-to-face talk included in this report, and he doesn’t have the appetite.”

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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Thu Apr 21, 2016 2:04 pm

The Jew York Times article propped up two lies at the same time: 9/11 was arabs, and when the economy tanks it'll be because of arabs.

They are also trying to play the "Obama is secretly a Muslim" meme (lie) as well.

What I'm wondering is, could it be that jewish control of Saudi Arabia (ie. the House of Saud) is slipping? Why would Western media be making them out to be bad guys? GWBush was kissing them during his term.

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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Thu Apr 21, 2016 6:43 pm

Saudis are jews ..... otherwise they with have 'Car-bombs'
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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Fri Apr 22, 2016 5:50 am

9/11 -- Saudis provided cover for the jew hijackers, provided some personnel, and took the heat. All in the family.

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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Tue Apr 26, 2016 10:49 pm

OldTimes wrote:
The Jew York Times article propped up two lies at the same time:  9/11 was arabs, and when the economy tanks it'll be because of arabs.

They are also trying to play the "Obama is secretly a Muslim" meme (lie) as well.

What I'm wondering is, could it be that jewish control of Saudi Arabia (ie. the House of Saud) is slipping? ...

Yes, I agree on your first two points - that is the strategy. About Saudi Arabia - I think Israel is getting ready to drop them, because of their failures. They have failed in Syria, and also got into a dreadful mess in Yemen, from which they can't get out.

All of a sudden, Saudi Arabia can be the bad guys - all their endless faults revealed. And indeed, they are a corrupt, disgusting lot. The upper levels of the Wahhabis have always been cryptos. They can get away, and the rest be the fall guys.
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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Wed Apr 27, 2016 12:12 am

BlackVeil wrote:
About Saudi Arabia - I think Israel is getting ready to drop them, because of their failures. They have failed in Syria, and also got into a dreadful mess in Yemen, from which they can't get out.

All of a sudden, Saudi Arabia can be the bad guys - all their endless faults revealed. And indeed, they are a corrupt, disgusting lot. The upper levels of the Wahhabis have always been cryptos. They can get away, and the rest be the fall guys.

Jews won't ditch the Saudis. Too much money/oil flow/economic leverage, and military collaboration (though Saudis are proving to be weaker militarily than previously thought)


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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Thu Apr 28, 2016 9:48 am

Within a week of the Saudi visit, Obama makes the snap announcement that a new deployment of 250 Special Forces soldiers into rebel territory will go ahead immediately.  Will they draw straws at their forward base in Germany to decide who'll be lucky enough to take part ... after a call for volunteers comes up 242 short?  

Will the 'moderate rebels' welcoming them illegally into Syria sense that they'll now be one step closer to achieving their dream of a free and Democratic Syria, embracing multicultural values, especially for Sunnis?

Will they bring their own kitchen crew and shun the low-fat FSA buffet?  It's important to get along well with these dedicated freedom fighters, after all.  Better don't forget the Marlboro's.

Reuters: 4/26/16
Obama sends more Special Forces to Syria in fight against IS
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-mideast-crisis-usa-syria-idUSKCN0XL0ZE

"... but the move was unlikely to mollify Arab allies angry over Washington's cautious approach to the conflict.



Seems more like a response to that Russian flyby in the Baltic than about anything the Saudis want.
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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Thu Apr 28, 2016 1:56 pm

puckatawk wrote:
"... but the move was unlikely to mollify Arab allies angry over Washington's cautious approach to the conflict."




The 'Free Syrian Army' -- talk about a group Team Z won't hesitate two seconds to throw under the bus if a large enough gain can be had

Sounds like a Bay of Pigs narrative -- leading up to what


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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Fri Apr 29, 2016 1:44 am

The 'plan' lacks any effective or substantial intent and is heavily limited by confusion over support for Kurds at odds with Turkey.    

ARA News: 4/23/16
U.S.: No decision yet to support Kurds to close ISIS-held Manbij pocket
http://aranews.net/2016/04/u-s-no-decision-yet-to-support-kurds-to-close-isis-held-manbij-pocket/

Analysts suggested that the Turkish government backed rebels to take the area from Marea until Jarabulus, to prevent the Kurds from connecting the city of Kobane to Efrin district in northwestern Syria. However, the Turkey-backed rebels failed to stop ISIS, and were pushed backed easily by the militant group.

Nevertheless, the US is still not ready to back the Kurds. “Not yet,” U.S. Army Colonel Steve Warren, a spokesman for the U.S.-led military campaign against Islamic State, said in a press conference from Baghdad. “So we’re still working through all of this.  I don’t have a timeline to give you,” he added, which suggests Turkey is still negotiating with the United States.



As soon as the Kurds have a peace deal worked out with Turkey, everything should proceed smoothly.
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PostSubject: Re: Why is Obama visiting Saudi Arabia right after the odd 9-11 issue?   Fri Apr 29, 2016 10:25 am

Warren is jewy.

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